Motonation Pursang Jacket and Phantom Pants Review

February 2013 Preview

Remember the Days? This is a preview of a BLAST FROM THE PAST issue of BikeSA. To view the full issue,...

January 2012 Preview

Remember the Days? This is a preview of a BLAST FROM THE PAST issue of BikeSA. To view the full issue,...

How Much Power Does The 2021 BMW R 18 Make?

The 2021 BMW R 18 heavyweight cruiser certainly gives you a lot to look at, but the monstrous 1,802cc or 110ci...

Benelli Releases 1200GT Tourer And Plans More Bikes

The new 1200GT is Benelli’s entry in the middleweight luxury sport-touring market. (Benelli/)Surely everybody wants to see Benelli succeed. A legendary Italian brand with...

2021 BMW M 1000 RR First Look

US pricing has not been set, but the BMW M 1000 RR’s price tag is expected to be close to $40,000. (BMW Motorrad/)If you...

Confusing Detonation And Preignition

Kevin Cameron (Robert Martin/)There are two major forms of abnormal combustion that can damage a spark-ignition piston engine, and they have entirely different causes...

Published in: Gear

Motonation Pursang Jacket  and Phantom Pants Review intro

Budget riding gear is steadily getting better and better, the best of which reach above their price points to offer comfort, performance, protection, and value. A name you should know in this market is Motonation. As the North American importer of Sidi and Forcefield, Motonation certainly knows high-quality motorcycle gear and they’ve chosen to put their own name behind a collection of gear which can stand proud with their other offerings. The Pursang jacket and Phantom pants are Motonations four-season adventure touring options which I’ve had the pleasure of testing for the past few months.

Motonation Pursang Phantom 1Both the Pursang jacket and Phantom pants start their construction with a 600-Denier polyester reinforced at the shoulders, elbows, forearms, knees, and inside of the lower legs with a robust ballistic nylon for additional abrasion resistance. All the zippers are quality YKK bits with robust pulls for easy use while wearing gloves. Stitching is clean and precise throughout, with double stitches in some areas, bar tacks, and reinforcement gussets in high-stress areas. Motonation aims for subtle branding; only one logo is present on the exterior of the jacket and is color matched to the material on the sand version. Hi-viz and black colors have contrast stitching but you still shouldn’t feel like a walking billboard while wearing them.

Both the jacket and pants also feature two removable layers, a Reissa waterproof-breathable liner and quilted thermal liner. The removable liners in other gear I’ve checked out don’t usually inspire ideas, but Motonation worked some thoughtful touches into these. Rain layers have full mesh linings to prevent any sticky-plastic-on-your-skin feeling and the jacket’s quilted liner has a pocket to restore some utility when two of the interior shell pockets are blocked. Speaking of pockets, you get 10 on the jacket and four on the pants, enough to please any hoarder on the move. Nearly all the pockets are sized and positioned to be useful and accessible while on the bike; the only oddities are the fleece-lined hand warmer pockets which can’t be closed or secured. A simple zipper would have provided two more spots to squirrel away items.

Fit is relatively slim for both garments but the sizing schemes are a little different between them; I wear a large in most “American” fit jackets and a large Pursang jacket fits me well. The Phantom pants are sized a little smaller, closer to “European” sizing, I am able to fit in an XL-short as the size chart suggested but would be more comfortable in an XXL-short. Both garments are cut to fit relatively close to the body and provide a slim fit. The pants have stretch material in the crotch and inner thigh which allows for extra comfort and range of motion despite the snug fit. Waterproof gussets and zippers up to the knees provide enough room to fit the pants over my Forma Adventure boots, but slimmer or lower boots may work better with the slim leg cut for some.

The slim fit continues at the wrists and collar, as well. While livable, these are two areas Motonation may want to consider refining in future iterations. At the wrists are two-way zippers with a mesh gusset on the forearm and Velcro at the cuff which closes over the zipper. If the cuffs were larger, this would provide adjustment, but even with short-cuff gloves it can be difficult to secure the Velcro. Lastly, the neck closure is a single-position snap which has a hook to hold it open when things are warm, but when it’s closed I would appreciate a wider position, just a little more room, or a touch of stretch for ideal comfort.

Protection is handled by CE-rated armor at the shoulders, elbows, and knees, with foam pads at the back and thighs. The armor used is relatively small and somewhat stiff and I’ve noticed it can shift a little in the pockets. On the back, the pad is a diamond shape and the pocket wouldn’t take any of the protectors I have for my other jackets, but I believe with some research you could find one to fit. Where I expected hip protection, I found foam pads which sit very low on the outer thigh. Personally, if I were doing any really intense riding I would pull the included armor and wear more substantial off-road armor for better coverage and protection I know won’t shift. I’m glad Motonation has included the armor and pads they have, but it’s one of the few notable areas of cost savings between the pieces.

Motonation Pursang 4

Adaptability to different weather conditions is an area where the Pursang jacket and Phantom pants excel. Autumn in the mid-Atlantic states can offer high temperatures above 90°F and lows below freezing,  usually with a significant amount of rain. When the mercury is up, eight intake and two exhaust vents on the jacket are paired with two each intake and exhaust vents on the pants to flow enough air to keep things cool while moving. While anything is hot when stopped in traffic, the sand color felt cooler than similar dark-colored jackets in my closet. In the rain, the Reissa liner has performed well; it’s only weak point is at the wrists where I had a small amount of water intrusion in heavy rain. I was concerned about the lack of a storm flap on the liner but the one on the jacket shell is up to the task and my core stayed dry. On a warm day, the rain liner’s mesh lining helps with breathability but ultimately will hold some moisture from perspiration. Lastly, the quilted insulating liners are adequate down to at least 40°F with appropriate base layers; if you’re planning on extended time spent in cooler temps I’d suggest supplementing or replacing them with more substantial mid-layers.

Overall, Motonation has come up with a fantastic budget offering for adventure riders in the Pursang jacket and Phantom pants combination. Pricewise, you can get a full suit for less than many jackets cost alone and it’s amazing they’re offering it in so many color and size options. At this price the armor compromise is easily overcome; depending on budget, one could have enough cash left over to bring your own armor layer or slip upgraded protectors in the pockets.

Motonation Pursang Phantom 4

Motonation.com

MSRP:

  • Jacket: $179.99 available in S–2XL in Sand, Black, Hi-Viz, and 3XL Black
  • Pants: $129.99 available in Short and Regular sizes M–2XL in Sand and Black and Regular 3XL Black

PROS:

  • True four-season versatility
  • Affordable
  • Available in short sizes and multiple colors
  • Very subtle branding
  • Pockets and plenty of ’em

CONS:

  • Rain and Insulating liners could be more breathable and warmer
  • Collar and wrist closures could use more adjustment
  • Budget armor—small, stiff, and shifty

Read more …

Church of MO: 2010 Harley-Davidson Road Glide Vs. 2010 Victory Cross Country

And this is from God; because for the Messiah’s sake it has been granted to you not only to trust in him but also to...

UPDATE: No Plans to sell 2021 Honda CBR600RR in US

Honda confirmed a remodeled CBR600RR is on the way. Full details about the 2021 Honda CBR600RR will be released on Aug. 21, but the...

Top Five Underrated Harley-Davidsons

Picking out underrated Harleys is tough, sort of the moto equivalent of writing up the five least-attractive Playboy centerfold moles, the five least-cute puppy...

Church of MO: 2010 Electric Motorcycle Shootout

As the world turns, dominus vobiscum, it seems we have made quite a bit of progress on the electric bike front over the last...

MO Tested: Bridgestone Battlecross X40 Review

Okay, maybe it’s not the last dirtbike tire you’ll ever need, but they last a heck of a long time and perform great as...

Harley or Indian? Which American Iron Icon is Right for You?

Two weeks ago we attempted: Indian vs Harley, Five Ways to Pick the Motorcycle That’s Right For You, and that was kind of fun. But...

Hilleberg Brings Out New Models for 2021

Published in: NewsHilleberg is proud to introduce two new tent models for 2021: the Black Label Soulo BL, a very strong, remarkably roomy and fully...

Mystery KTM Model Leaked Alongside Norden 901

Published in: News   Unveiled as a concept bike at the 2019 EICMA show, Husqvarna’s Norden 901 stirred the proverbial ADV pot with its possible 890cc...

The Rekluse RadiusX for KTM 1190R Review

Published in: Gear“Look Mom, No Hands!” The name Rekluse is well known and highly respected within the off-road communities worldwide as the leader in auto-clutch...

DENALI Electronics Launches the T3 Switchback Signal Pods

Published in: NewsDENALI Electronics has reinvented the common turn signal to create a shockingly bright amber turn signal with an integrated white DRL in...

LEAKED – Black Dog Cycle Works KTM 390 Adventure Skid Plate

Published in: NewsWhen KTM released their long awaited 390 Adventure, the tin sheet of a skid plate attached to the frame seemed like the...

All-New Trail 125 Joins Honda’s 2021 Lineup

Published in: NewsThe model honors the past while offering modern on- and off-road trekking performance Sixty years after Honda introduced customers to the joys of...